How Rollingstone.com Hires Photographers

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I'm sure almost anyone who's ever tried to make money by being a photographer has dreamed of shooting pictures for Rolling Stone. The covers are iconic, the spreads hypnotic, it's the creme de la creme of artists capturing artists. But how does one get those jobs, how does one get noticed? 
  
Holly Stuart Hughes writing for PDN online did a really interesting interview with Ahmed Fakhr, director of photography at RollingStone.com about how his photographic and video needs are changing, and how he now evaluates the skills of potential contributors.

If you're interested in one day taking photos for the legendary magazine, it's an interview worth reading. Here's an Excerpt:

PDN: Are you looking for photographers who can do video, or do you prefer to have stills and video handled by different people?
A.F.: I think it's a great asset for any photographer to know how to do video, especially to know how to do video well. We're always looking for photographers who can do both. For our festival coverage, we are usually only able to get one photographer approved by the festival, so to have someone who can do video at the same time is great. Then we know we're covered in terms of live performance images on the still side, and they can also capture short videos. At these festivals we're focused on trying to do a few more Instagram Stories to bring our viewers into the festival and give them the Rolling Stone point of view.
We collaborated with [the band] Cage the Elephant, who allowed us to do a day-in-the-life experience at Lollapalooza. We used still photos and video clips as well in our Instagram Stories. It was a way to bring our followers into the middle of things, letting them see Cage the Elephant getting ready to go on stage.

PDN: You're on a PhotoPlus Expo panel called "What Photo Editors Want Now." What do you want from photographers "now"?
A.F.: Besides great work, I think we want people who can think in a social sense. That's big now: Someone who thinks about how their work can translate to something different on Instagram or Twitter or Facebook. There's a big push for video on Facebook, and that's something we're all trying to do.
What's really great is photographers who think of ideas for how to promote a story in a new way or how to do something different that would extend the story on social media. Whether that's a short video clip or an animation, that could be very useful.
We hire photographers for their creativity so we want their opinion.



Head over to PDN for the full article with pictures and links.



Source: PDN