Flickr is Finally Free of the Ghost of Yahoo.

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Flickr started at a time when digital images were still kind of new and it was an easy way for users to share their photos with friends, family and the world if you wanted to. Yahoo bought Flickr in 2005 before everyone was using Facebook or Instagram and they kind of didn't know what to do with it. 

Its main purpose has always been to share photos you've taken at the quality you took them at. It was a service that started more for professionals. Instagram and Facebook photos are usually compressed to save space if you wanted more space for high-res photos on Flickr... you had to pay for more storage. 

It's a great concept, but it's a product that has a limited user base, there are over 90 million registered users on Flickr, which is a lot, but nowhere near the over 800 million Instagram has. So, how does a big company make money with that?

Yahoo put money into Flickr and tried to make it something that everyone could and should use for their images, but again, Instagram and Facebook were too formidable and Yahoo had more pressing things on their mind.

Verizon bought Yahoo and all of its parts and then tried to re-brand the old company as something called Oath before deciding to break some of it down and sell them for parts like an old VW. This is where SmugMug enters. 

Like Flickr, SmugMug was started at a time before social media was a big thing, way back in 2002. Also, like Flickr, SmugMug is a paid image sharing, image hosting, and online video platform. Unlike Flickr however, SmugMug never sold their company to a large corporation. It's still owned by Chris and Don MacAskill, a father and son team who started the company out of their garage.

SmugMug provides a very specific service and they're not trying to be anything that they're not. That kind of attitude from a shrewd company that's been able to survive in the current digital landscape could be immensely helpful to a company like Flickr that's been at the whim of large corporations with grand ideas for the past decade. Fingers crossed.


Source: MASHABLE