Draw This is a Polaroid Camera That Turns Your Photos Into Cartoons.

Draw This samples.jpg
Have you ever wanted to take a picture of something and have it instantly turned into a drawing that may have been made by a seven-year-old? Well, thanks to Dan MacNish, if you're into tinkering, you're in luck. 

Draw This is a polaroid camera that draws cartoons. You point, and shoot - and out pops a cartoon; the camera's best interpretation of what it saw. The camera is a mash up of a neural network for object recognition, the google quickdraw dataset, a thermal printer, and a raspberry pi.

Kapwing has also created an online version of the program. You can check it out here. It works the exact same way as Draw This except you just have to upload a photo and it will create the doodle using the quick draw dataset for you. 

Draw This camera printing.jpg

Github has all the code and items you'll need to make this on your own here. As you can probably tell from the images, this isn't perfect. It uses Google' existing code to recognize objects and that's far from perfect. It is, however, the beginning of something very cool. With no digital viewfinder you never ever get to see what the original version of the photo was. Which, to be honest at this stage of production is probably wise as it will temper your expectations. 


Draw This box with printings.jpg
Imagine version 3.0 of this that makes an accurate cartoon version of whatever image you feed it. How cool would it be to go through old photos and make a cartoon movie of how your grandparents met or of a significant moment in your life? This could simplify a whole subgenre of storytelling with the push of a button.  

Yes, right now an image you take will most not even resemble the original picture and It will probably cost you about a hundred bucks in parts just to make this camera that will do nothing but delight children. But there's a fun whimsy about it. Inventing something that is silly and serves no purpose but to put a smile on your face is a welcome addition to the world right now.

Source: Dan Macnish