LensBaby

Steve's Digicams

Agfa ePhoto 1280





(Review posted 9/15/97)


Jump to sample photos

If you're one of those weirdos (like me) that wants a digital camera to look like a digital camera then you'll love the ePhoto 1280 because it certainly can't be mistaken for a film camera. It does NOT have any kind of optical viewfinder, you use the 2-inch TFT color LCD screen for everything; framing your subject, previewing the stored images and for setting the multitude of camera functions and options.

The entire camera will fit into an average sized palm and weighs about a pound and a half with the batteries in it. Speaking of batteries, the 1280 comes with NiMH rechargable AA-size batteries and a nice table top charger unit - all included in the base package! Agfa was smart enough to realize that an LCD-only digicam tends to go through batteries like candy so they gave us the best. The manual tells you that alkaline batteries are an extremely poor choice for this camera and recommends using the supplied NiMH, NiCd or lithium type cells only. It is ALWAYS a very good idea to buy at least one or two other sets of NiMH cells and keep them fully charged and ready to go into the camera.

The included IQ9000 "smart" battery charger works with NiMH, NiCd, lithium (CR-123A 3v) and even regular alkaline batteries. It even has a discharger cycle for NiCd batteries to insure that they are fully charged rather than just topped off. This is not your ordinary battery charger by any means and always indicates with green and red LEDs just exactly what is going on during the charging process. It is capable of fully recharging a set of NiMH batteries in about 2 hours.

NOTE: Agfa admits that there is a PROBLEM with the IQ 9000 chargers supplied with the ePhoto 1280 cameras. Simply call their Tech Support line at 602-366-3260 (in the U.S.) and they will FedEx you a NEW charger to replace the original one. The symptoms are POOR BATTERY life even though the batteries have been fully recharged.

Added Note: I called Agfa Support on 12/1/97 at 4pm and got the new IQ 9000 charger on 12/2/97 at 9:30am. Not only did Agfa send me a new charger, they also included a new set of NiMH batteries for free.

I have dealt with a lot of companies and nobody has ever handled a problem this quickly to my complete satisfaction. I hope I never have another problem with my camera but I'm sure glad to know that Agfa will be able to solve it so promptly and professionally.

It's really difficult to tell you how long the batteries will last as it depends solely on your operating habits. The manual says the life of the batteries is "one hour" of display time. If you use the LCD a lot then the batteries get exhausted fairly quickly but will usually last long enough to fill two to four 4MB SSFDC cards full of pictures and still let you download them to the computer. I had no trouble getting the PhotoWise software to talk to the camera at 115,200 baud so the transfers were fairly quick, even when downloading 1280x960 "super" resolution images that end up being slightly smaller than a megabyte.

The really good news for all of folks with the new digicams that use the SSFDC memory cards - Olympus has now released their PCMCIA adapter for 3.3v SSFDC cards. Larry at Norman Camera (www.normancamera.com) emailed me today and said that he would begin shipping them by November 13 at a cost of $99 each. Remember that you only need ONE of these adapters no matter how many SSFDC flash cards you have. Of course you do need to have a laptop or desktop computer with a PCMCIA reader installed in it. I have also seen a message from Ron Risman at State Street Direct that the 8MB SSFDC cards are now available at $65 so it looks as if the new 3.3v SSFDC standard is rapidly gaining strength.

It takes a while to get used to using the 1280. The LCD screen portion of the camera swivels 180-degrees in one direction and 90-degrees in the other. This allows you to easily shoot self-portraits and when you do the image on the LCD screens flips upside down accordingly like most modern camcorders. There is a 5- and 10-second self-timer option that can be turned on when needed. The 1280 also outputs continuous video while its LCD is on so you can also hook up the cable to a TV set and place it behind the camera facing you for a really big preview image. The camera does its final focusing and white balancing just before taking the picture after the 5 or 10 second timer interval has expired.

An interesting feature of the ePhoto 1280 is that the flash unit is attached to the side of the lens. This means that as you swivel the main body of the camera with the LCD screen the flash remains constant with the lens - always aiming towards the subject. It may not be as flexible as the Minolta Dimage V with a detachable, tethered lens but it sure takes much better quality pictures. You can easily hold the 1280 up over your head for a "crowd shot" and still see the LCD!

As with most LCD-only digicams it is not exactly the greatest camera for use outside in the sunlight. It does work fairly well in this capacity though as the screen is bright and sharp but often needs to be shaded with your hand as it has no hood over the top of it. Using it indoors is a snap and most all of my pictures came out well-focused and colorful using the default "automatic" settings. You do the usual "press the shutter halfway" thing to make the camera autofocus and set the white balance and then depress the shutter fully to take the picture. The shutter delay due to autofocusing is very quick, rated at less than a second. I found the autofocus system to be accurate about 95% of the time but sometimes it needed a second chance at getting it right.

The one thing that annoyed me about the new Olympus D-600L was its lack of manual controls -- not a problem with the ePhoto 1280, it has a plethora of user controls and overrides. Using the "Easy Pilot" control wheel you activate the on-screen menu by pressing it in and then rotating it to select options and accept them by pressing it in again. Very simple, very slick!

Things get really interesting once you access the "Advanced Settings" submenu, from here you can set:

Self-Timer: for 5 or 10 seconds delay or off (default).

Focus: Macro, 1M, 2M, 5M or infinity.

Exposure: Leads off to 3 more options:

    Manual - a slider control that goes from +3 to -3 and shows immediately on the LCD screen.

    Aperature - Large (f/2.8-3.5), Medium (f/5.6-6.4) or Small (f/8-9.1) for depth of field control.

    Shutter: 1/500, 1/250, 1/125, 1/60, 1/30, 1/16, 1/8 or Auto.

White Point: Prompts you to aim the camera at a "known" white source in your subject and then sets the white balance accordingly.

External Flash: For "synching" with slave-operated strobe units there are two sets of three options available. Small, Medium or Large aperture with 1/200 shutter or Small, Medium or Large aperture with a shutter speed of 1/100.

Even when shooting in full auto mode you have the usual +/- 3 EV adjustments to correct for unusual lighting conditions. Even though the 1280 is rated at ISO 100 (the same as the Olympus D-600L) I found that it was much more capable of taking indoor pictures without the flash without getting "blurry" photos due to slow shutter speeds. It doesn't yield perfect shots everytime but it does work well if you steady yourself properly and shoot in wideangle (f/2.8). The flash does tend to be a bit harsh when used on closeup objects but you can compensate for this with the EV adjustments or by manually stopping the lens aperture down.

In the "real world" I found the ePhoto 1280 to take good pictures in most indoor and outdoor lighting conditions. Depending on the mode (resolution) that you're shooting in there is a 8 to 16 second delay between pictures while the camera compresses/stores each image. All of the 1280's modes generate standard JPG images except for the "1280" mode which is interpolated by the PhotoGenie software. The preview image on the LCD screen is frozen until the camera is ready to take the next picture and then it goes back into "live" preview mode again. If you're shooting in a dimly lit area the LCD can be switched to low-light mode which improves detail for focusing and framing the subject. This is similar to the "gain up" feature of a camcorder but it is NOT grainy looking, it is quite bright and clear. When in the low-light mode the LCD screen is not updated as often and the images are herky-jerky but very useable.

The ePhoto 1280 can be controlled from the computer while tethered with the serial port cable. You can set most all of its functions with a mouse click and it displays an on-screen preview image before pressing the shutter and taking the picture. This allows the 1280 to be used as an automatic camera for doing employee ID or passport type photos by relatively unskilled operators. This plus the fact that there are advanced options for using the 1280 with external flash units makes this camera highly versatile.

The 3:1 zoom lens is smooth and quite fast going from wideangle to telephoto positions. It does not make much noise while zooming and seems to be a well-engineered design. As with most zoom digicams the maximum aperture of the lens is dependent on the focal length. At wideangle position the lens is rated at f/2.8 but if you're in telephoto that is reduced to f/3.5. When compared to a 35mm camera the 1280's lens focal length is a continuous 38-114mm.

Now on to the big issue - camera resolution. The ePhoto 1280's real resolution is 1024x768 which is default when first turned on. It achieves 1280x960 resolution when using the Agfa PhotoGenie software which in the words of Lisa deBettencourt, Applications Engineer for ePhoto Digital Cameras at Agfa:

    "The PhotoGenie technology is actually not what you typically know as 'interpolation' but an amazing system of artificially intelligent algorithms that analyze each and every 1280 image when it is brought into the software.

    After each image is analyzed, PhotoGenie quantifies and qualifies each pixel according to the traits it possesses and then reconstructs the image. During the reconstruction phase, it also removes any JPEG artifacts it finds that result from the compression applied in the camera. As a result of the reconstruction process, new pixels are generated and the final resolution becomes 1280x960.

    You can see the difference yourself by performing a simple test. Take one picture in 780hi mode and then take the same picture in 1280 mode and allow PhotoGenie to do its thing to reconstruct the image and increase the resolution. Bring both of the images into PhotoShop and use 'Image Size' to use bicubic interpolation to increase the resolution of the 780hi image. Now both images will be the same physical size. Look at them side by side and you will see the image quality differences between the two.

    We licensed this technology from a company that has mainly been using their AI technology in medical imaging. We then worked with them for nearly a year to customize this amazing technology to the capabilities of our camera and to be sold in the consumer market."

The 1280x960 high resolution is only necessary if you are planning to print your images at 5x7 inches or larger on a high-resolution photo type printer. The 1024x768 "real" resolution is fine for most people's day-to-day pictures for use on the computer screen, web pages or as email attachments.

The resolution can be selected easily from the main menu by picking one of the following options: 1280, 780 HI, 780 S, 307 HI, or 307 S. Agfa came up with these labels in referrence to their digital camera models, the ePhoto 307, the (soon-to-be-sold) ePhoto 780 and the new ePhoto 1280. The "780" modes are 1024x768 pixels and differ only in the amount of compression used. The "307" modes are 640x480 pixels and again, the difference is the amount of image compression applied.

The number of images you can store per SSFDC card varies as some images will end up being compressed smaller than what the camera considers to be "average." When you first switch it on with a 4MB card in the camera it says you can take 12 pictures but it is not uncommon to end up with 14 to 16 pictures before the card is full. It's the same story with the "307" modes but the "1280" mode never lies as each image occupies a little less than a megabyte on the card. The base figures for resolution/images per 4MB card is:

1280 - 6
780 HI - 12
780 S - 24
307 HI - 30
307 S - 60

For those of you that love "specs" here's a whole bunch of them for the ePhoto 1280. Physical size in inches is 2H x 6-1/8W x 3-3/4D. The imager is a 1/3" IT-CCD yellow/cyan/magenta/green. The shutter under automatic control varies from 1/4 to 1/500th of a second. The LCD screen is 2 inches (measured diagonally), TFT poly-silicon type with 110,000 active pixels. The autofocus systems handles 10cm to infinity in wideangle position and 80cm to inifinity in telephoto. In macro mode the autofocus range is 10cm to 1M in wide, 50cm to 1M in telephoto. The flash unit has a guide number of 7.8 and an operational range of 20cm to 2.6M in normal and 40cm to 75cm in macro mode. There are four flash modes: Auto, Fill-In, RedEye Reduction and Off.

All in all I found the ePhoto 1280 to be a very good digicam with above average picture quality. Battery life is good to poor as with all LCD-only digicams, this could be improved by using a lithium rechargable battery like the Sony Mavicas. But there is utility in the theory of using AA-size cells, they're readily available at the local 7-11 store in the event that your rechargables go dead when you've left the charger at home. The ergonomics of the 1280 take a little getting used to, at first it is slightly awkward to hold but this soon becomes second nature. The user controls are simple but powerful and put in the right places considering the size and shape of the camera. The lens is threaded so you can put 46mm filters on it to protect the lens or use auxilliary closeup filters to get even closer than it already gets in macro mode. Considering the weight (13.3oz without batteries) it could be mounted on a telescope or microscope without damaging the unit. For lab work you'd definitely want the optional AC power supply to keep the weight down and not have to worry about replacing the batteries.

Agfa will be bringing out another new digicam shortly called the ePhoto 780 which will have all the same features of the 1280 except for the 1280x960 resolution mode. The price of course will be even lower than the 1280 and might better fit your budget if you don't need the ultra high resolution mode for printing your pictures.

As always, all opinions expressed in this user review are mine and mine alone. I speak for no camera manufacturer or camera store, I'm just a consumer who spends his money the way you do - one dollar at a time (OK, so maybe a thousand at a time!)

Additional text added on 11/13/97

Today I tried some things to try to "fool" either the autofocus or the autoexposure system and failed miserably in my attempts to do so. While at my local camera store I took a hip-shot of the salesman and positioned the camera so that I intentionally got a four-foot double flourescent fixture directly behind his head. I shot with the camera in total default "auto everything" mode and was amazed to see the results. The guy's face and body were perfectly exposed even with the bright light directly behind his head.

I also took several pictures of the sales lady behind the counter to see how well the red eye reduction flash worked. The first shot was head on with normal flash and one of her eyes showed the usual red eye effect. I told her to smile again and look directly at the camera and switched it to "red eye" mode on the flash and took a second picture. Both of her pupils were brightly lit with the flash and not one single bit of red showed in either eye.

I read a user review of the Ephoto 1280 by someone on CompuServe and he complained that the camera didn't do well with flesh tones. I have to totally disagree as the shots I took today of the guy and the gal at the camera store both had very natural and continuous looking skin tones. I took one of the shots of the gal and printed it out at 96dpi in PhotoImpact which made it literally fill the entire page on my Epson Stylus Photo printer. It's hard to tell it from a real photo made by film and chemicals. The same picture when printed at 200dpi was about 4x6 inches and it looked better than most of my prints from my 35mm film camera and Kodak Professional photo finishing. All of these pictures were taken in the "780 HI" mode which is 1024x768 with very low JPG compression.

At this same camera store they have a big fish tank in the center of the store with an underwater camera in it. I positioned myself so that the front glass door was behind the tank with the strong afternoon Florida sunlight coming in through it. I forced the flash off and took a hand held shot of the tank with the glare of the overhead flourescent lights bouncing off of the glass and the sunlight streaming in behind it. I figured this shot would be a disaster at best right? Wrong! It came out perfectly focused as well as perfectly exposed on the tank, the fish inside and quite a bit of the room around it. I was indeed amazed and so was the salesman, he made a note of the digicam I was using and said he'd call his Agfa distributor and order some of them in ASAP.

While I was at the camera store I got a 46mm UV filter for my new Agfa ePhoto 1280 - it's cheap insurance for protecting the lens and I never use a camera without some kind of "protector" filter over the lens. I also got a 46->49mm stepup ring so I could use my Tiffen closeup filter set to improve the macro range of the 1280. Later at home I screwed the stepup ring onto the 1280 and mounted all three Tiffen closeup filters (+1, +2, and +4) and began taking some test photos. The easiest way to do these tests and see your results quickly is to mount the camera on a small table-top tripod and plug it into the computer and control it via the serial port cable. I was able to use the preview function on the computer screen to frame the shot and then take it and download it quickly to see the results on the "big" screen.

Without closeup filters I have been able to take some really detailed photos at a range of about 4-5 inches with the ePhoto 1280. With the stacked Tiffen closeup filters I was able to take perfectly focused shots at a range of about 1-1/2 to 2 inches! Most all of these shots were done with the camera's flash turned off and for fill-in light I used a small table-top flourescent fixture that has a bulb in it that claims to output "natural daylight balanced" light. The results have been outstanding to say the least. I also did some handheld shots of the inside of my Pentium 233 computer using the 1280's flash at a range of about three inches. I used the manual exposure control and set the aperture to "minimum" to both increase the depth of field and to limit the amount of light from the flash at this extremely close range. The pictures all came out perfectly exposed except for a few small and very shiny pieces of metal that reflected back into the camera - again I was totally amazed at the overall quality of the pictures.

After leaving the camera store I went off to Dunedin Beach to get some sun-sand-water-boat shots but the sun ducked behind some clouds and stayed that way for the rest of the afternoon. I went ahead and shot all kinds of beach and landscape scenes and they all looked good on the camera's LCD screen. Later at home these same shots all looked a little dim and had to be brightened by software. Next time I will set the exposure control on the 1280 to the +2 EV override and see if I can brighten up my outdoor pics a little. The underexposure was very consistent so it is easily corrected by using the EV overrides, that is what they are for, right?

More text added 11/19/97

Well, I've had the ePhoto for well over a week now and have put it through the paces. Battery life is still a problem as with all the LCD-only cameras. I have 3 sets of NiMh plus a set of NiCd batteries so I don't really have the problem of running out of batteries in the middle of shooting but, changing the batteries is a bit of a hassle. The ePhoto 1280's battery compartment has all four cells laying side by side to keep the height of the body as slim as possible. They do have one of those pull-strap thingees under the batteries which makes lifting them up and out easier. I guess I got real spoiled by my Ricoh RDC-2 which has a little door you open and all four batteries fall out in your hand.

I still don't have my SSFDC->PCMCIA adapter yet so I have to use the slowwwwwwwwwww serial port cable to download all of my pics. This also puts a drain on the batteries plus my time as I'm used to just popping a memory card out and popping it into my PCMCIA drive and directly reading the image files. Not for much longer as Larry from Norman Camera emailed me tonight and told me he was sending my adapter out tomorrow (yeah!)

I am very impressed with the way the ePhoto 1280 works except in the bright sunlight. The camera still takes a great picture but the LCD screen is difficult to see to frame the shot. I have learned that a good way to do this is to hold the camera slightly above eye level and tilt the LCD screen down and making it shade itself. This is a great use for the flexible lens/LCD configuration of the 1280. Other LCD-only cameras with the screen fixed to the same camera body as the lens would not allow you to do this.

I have noticed that the LCD image that is frozen on the screen while the camera is storing the image is not always a proper representation of the stored image. This is seen a lot in flash pictures where the frozen image appears to be over-exposed and on the bright side. To make sure I flip it from Record to Playback mode and view the real stored image which looks properly exposed. After seeing it do this consistently I stopped playing back the stored images once I got used to the lighter "frozen" image. I have also seen the same thing on the LCD of my Kodak DC-120 so I think it has something to do with the way these digital cameras grab a quick-preview image to display versus the one that is actually being processed and stored into memory.

I am still trying to make the ePhoto 1280 take a bad picture but so far the only ones that have come out bad have been those taken in a dark room where the subject was well beyond the range of the flash. You can press the shutter button as fast as you want and it still gets the focus and exposure right at least 95% of the time. The only other digicam I've had that takes pictures as consistently good as the 1280 is the Kodak DC-120. I've given it a good test by just handing it to someone whose never used it before and tell them only to aim it, frame it and press the button - out comes another great shot, in focus and properly exposed.

Yesterday I saw a press release from Agfa for their upcoming new ePhoto 780 camera. The only specs were that it is a 310,000 pixel CCD with a real resolution of 640x480 but interpolated by the PhotoGenie(tm) software to 1024x768. The new camera will have both an optical viewfinder as well as an LCD screen but no specs were given on the lens or the suggested retail price. It is supposed to be available in January 1998. I'm guessing (maybe hoping) that the price will be in the $500 range and hopefully it will have a 3X zoom?

More text added 11/27/97

I got the Olympus SSFDC->PCMCIA-ATA adapter from Larry the other day and what a pleasure it is to just pop a card full of images into the PCMCIA slot and download them quickly. I happily put the serial port cable back in the box and stuffed it in the closet! Both the Olympus and Simple Technology PCMCIA adapters handle both the 3.3V and 5V SmartMedia SSFDC cards so no matter which type of camera and media you use you only need one PCMCIA adapter to handle them. With the PhotoWise Quicklink running in the task bar the minute you pop the PCMCIA card into the drive it "sees" it and launches the download software automatically. Very simple, very quick - a few minutes later there's all your JPG images sitting in a subdirectory ready to be viewed or manipulated.

For those interested -- the Agfa AC adapter outputs 6.5VDC at 2.5 amps - the center pin is positive. Don't try using any of those "whimpy" Radio Shack AC/DC wall warts as they don't put out enough amperage to run the camera's LCD and flash unit. Most of the cheap wall warts are also not fully rectified and put out a good deal of AC voltage as well as DC voltage which can damage the camera's internal electronics.

I posted some new images to my Agfa ePhoto1280 page showing just how well the camera handles extremely adverse lighting conditions. One of the pictures even has the sun shining directly into the lens and it still made a very good exposure.

Please note that a lot of the images have been reduced 50% in size and compressed with a JPG factor of 80 to save on download space. My web server is NOT unlimited, there are several full-size images available, look at the notes below to determine which is which.

Text added 1/15/98

The 8MB 3.3v SSFDC cards are beginning to show up at various dealers around the country. I got two of them from Ron at State Street Direct for $65/ea. They are Simple Technology brand and work perfectly in the ePhoto1280. Hopefully in the next month or so the 8MB cards will be more plentiful. Toshiba has announced the availability of 16MB cards in July or August of 1998 and the 32MB cards about a month later.

Text added 1/29/98

Bob Martin (martin@inmind.com) gave me the following information about the current draw of the Agfa ePhoto1280 camera:

The battery drain and indicator response of the 1280 is as follows:

Full charge    5 bars on     5.0v  @ 850 mA
               4 bars on     4.9v  @ 900 mA
               3 bars on     4.66v @ 960 mA
               2 bars on     4.56v @ 990 mA
               1 bar  on     4.33v @ 1.05 A
               0 bars on     4.12v @ 1.2  A
All gone       SHUT OFF      4.09v

With the serial cable plugged in, there is practically no power consumed... I would have needed to fetch another meter to read it.

The FOCUS motor or the ZOOM motor increases the current drain by about 200..225 mA and the power on transient is quite significant.

Once the battery indicator has shown a lower voltage, it will not show a higher indication until it's turned off... It's a one way thing.

The measurements were made with a dummy battery, not with the external power connector, and the accuracy is 'fair'. i.e. not NIST traceable :)

text added 1/31/98

I went to my local camera store today and bought a video camera 2X teleconverter to try on the ePhoto1280. It came with a 52mm threaded lens mount so all I had to add was a 46mm->52mm filter stepup ring to mount it on the 1280. Total cost was $60 for the 2X teleconverter and another $8 for the stepup ring.

The results were fantastic! I now have an ePhoto1280 with the equivalent of a 228mm telephoto lens. At anything less than the full zoom setting it does start vignetting the edges of the picture frame but hey, I bought it to extend my telephoto range not my wideangle range.

It adds about one f-stop of darkness to the picture which the 1280's exposure system compensates for automatically. The image quality showed little to no deterioration with the teleconverter added to the Agfa's fine optics. Needless to say that going from a 3:1 to a 6:1 zoom lens means you will see a lot more camera shake when you double the focal length. This isn't a big problem in the bright sunlight as the camera picks a pretty fast shutter speed and thus eliminates any blurring. In dimmer lighting it will be necessary to mount the camera on a tripod though. Most of my uses for a doubled telephoto are only going to be outside in the daylight so I'm not too worried about it.

The teleconverter did not bother the 1280's auto white balance and comparison pictures with and without it showed exactly the same colors and saturation values.

This is a cheap and effective way to double your 1280's zoom lens and believe me, it works fantastically well. See my Agfa ePhoto1280 web page, I just added a "before and after" picture that shows how well this auxillary lens works. I also have a picture of the 1280 with the lens mounted on it.

About the only negative thing I have to say about adding heavy lenses on the front of the 1280 is that it wasn't intended to do this and... if you try to hold the camera by the LCD unit with one hand the lens section will "droop" down and point at the ground. With a teleconverter, wideangle converter or even a set of three closeup filters on the camera you will see this "drooping" action -- which isn't a problem when you hold the camera with both hands the way you're supposed to anyway.

These video camera teleconverter lense are readily available at most camera and video stores, pick one up and give it a try!

My next experiment will be with a .5X wideangle auxilliary lens which will no doubt give me some wild fish-eye effects when added to the already-wide 1280 lens.

-Steve Sanders






Please note that all pictures are EXACTLY the way they came out of the camera - no color, brightness or other filters have been applied.

Most pictures were down-sized 50% w/Quality 80 JPG using ThumbsPlus. I'd love to post nothing but full-size images but I have server limitations.



agfa01.jpg
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agfa02.jpg
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agfa03.jpg
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agfa07.jpg
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agfa08.jpg
agfa08.jpg

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agfa09.jpg
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agfa10.jpg
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agfa12.jpg
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fishtank.jpg
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incredible.jpg
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pcboard2.jpg
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dof.jpg
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eliz-mar.jpg
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jo-to.jpg
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watch.jpg
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showcase.jpg
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sun1.jpg
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eliz-chin.jpg
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agfa_hires.jpg
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Notes on some pictures

agfa06, agfa07 & agfa08 are non-flash, handheld with average room light

pcboard2.jpg was shot at 1.5 inches with Tiffen +1,+2,+4 closeup filters

dof.jpg used tripod no flash, foreground is 1ft, background is abt 12ft

watch.jpg is macro flash at 2 inches with Tiffen +1,+2,+4 filters

sun1.jpg, sun2.jpg & sun3.jpg demonstrates how well the automatic
exposure works in adverse lighting conditions like direct sunlight.

agfa_hires.jpg is an example of the 1280 x 960 hi-res mode (JPG quality 80)




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